Archive for March, 2011


Society of Genealogists update to SoG Data Online

 Society of Genealogists update to SoG Data Online

Tim Lawrence , Head of Library Services at the Society of Genealogists has just informed me that he has finished uploading the following family history datasets to SoG Data Online. These can be searched  by members through the Society’s website www.sog.org.uk  following the links to MySoG. Non members can of course make a free search to see if the family surnames they are interested in are represented within any of the datasets.

Datasets now on  SoG Data Online:

Boyd’s Marriage Index (Main series and 1st Miscellaneous Series)

Boyd’s London burials

PCC wills 1750-1800

Vicar General marriage licence allegations index

Faculty Office marriage licence allegations index

St Leonard’s Shoreditch burials 1805-1858

St Andrew Holborn marriages 1754-1812

The following datasets which contain a a large number of  image files will be added to the Society Of Genealogists website more gradually. The completion date for this is May 2011, However, all can now be searched on www.findmypast.co.uk :

Apprentices of Great Britain

Boyd’s Family Units

Boyd’s London Inhabitants

Teachers Registration Council

Trinity House Calendars

Bank of England Wills

The addition of Boyd’s marriage index, by far the largest dataset, has slowed the search engine down slightly but Tim and his team are investigating this and will, hopeful ly, sort the problem out soon.

Tim also tells me he will be publishing more detailed information about each individual data set shortly so do keep an eye on the blog for this news.

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Countdown to Society of Genealogists Centenary Conference

There are still a few places left for the Society’s One Day Conference – an essential day out for dedicated family historians

Breaking the Barriers – Innovative Genealogy in the 20th and 21st Century will take place on Saturday 7th May at the The Royal Overseas League, Over-Seas House, Park Place, 5 St James’s Terrace, London SW1A 1LP

Tickets are available from the Society’s online shop

A full list of Speakers and details of programme for the day can be found on the Society of Genealogists conference blog

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Family Historians to be Ambassadors for 2011 Census

 

It’s countdown to census time and  family historians will no doubt have noticed that the 2011 census team has been engaging with the genealogy community since last autumn  through a family history area on the website  www.census.gov.uk/2011familyhistory

Family historians  are invited to share their stories of how they have used the historic censuses in their research and post the stories on the census website. These stories have provided some of the most engaging content on the site. The census team has also created a fan  page on Facebook www.facebook.com/2011censusfamilyhistory  for members of the of the public to share their stories, tips and hints and tell how the’ ve  used the census to find people from their past. The Facebook fanpage also links back to the Societ y of Genealogists Facebook fanpage so why not visit both? if you “like” them then you can follow news and updates about the census leading up to census night and, of course, hear what’s going on at the  SoG.

The 2011 census website also includes tips on the census pages about tracing your family history and how the historic censuses can help. There is also a very useful free information leaflet on on the Society of Genealogists Website  which will help you use the census records of England and Wales in your family history research

With census well and truly in our minds and the scehdules falling through our front door, more and more people are  now signing up to the 2011 census Facebookpage and web pages. Will the 2011 census be of help to family historians in one hundred years? It’s up to the family history census ambassadors to ensure it is as complete a record as it can possibly be.

Ancestry.co.uk ‘branches’ into living relatives

The Society of Genealogists has received the following family history news update from Ancestry:

Ancestry.co.uk, has enhanced its product range by adding Living Relative Search - a service new by PeopleTracer to help Ancestry members locate living UK-based relatives.

Peopletracer is a newly formed people-tracing company from one of the UK’s leading data specialists, Tracesmart. Its founders have more than ten years’ tracing experience locating thousands of people.

In addition to building their family trees and searching 870 million UK historical family history records, Ancestry.co.uk members can now also trace lost or just discovered living relatives

Living Relative Search is a fast and convenient way of finding living relatives living in the UK. To start the search, members just need to type in the name of the family member and click ‘search’. A more refined search can also be conducted by entering the relative’s last known location or exact address.

The data is sourced from the Edited Electoral Rolls, 2003-2011, telephone directory records, land registry records and Google maps, and is regularly updated to ensure that the most accurate search is always being carried out.

Angela Wiseman from Ancestry.co.uk comments: “Increasingly, we hear stories of our members finding, or wanting to find, recently discovered relatives, so we’re very excited about providing them with the necessary tools to make connections with living family members as well as their ancestors.”

Mike Trezise from Peopletracer comments: “Working with an established brand is very exciting and will hopefully help a significant number of people connect with lost relatives.”

Click here to start tracing your lost relatives now.

 

 

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Findmypast (sponsors of the Society of Genealogists’ centenary year and host of some 9 million names from the SoG online Library Collections)  have had a busy time recently. The Society has received the following update of new ventures and online family history records relating to the British in India.

Selections from the India Office Records and a century of electoral registers will be made online

The British Library and family history website www.findmypast.co.uk are to digitise a treasure trove of family history resources held by the Library, making them available online and fully searchable for the first time.

The project will involve the scanning of UK electoral registers covering the century that followed the Reform Act of 1832, along with records of baptisms, marriages and burials drawn from the archives of the India Office. When available online, these collections will enable historians, genealogists and family history researchers to make connections and track down details of ancestors and others at the click of a mouse – work that would previously have necessitated visits to the Library’s Reading Rooms and many hours of laborious manual searching.

The British Library holds the national collection of electoral registers covering the whole of the United Kingdom.  The registers contain a vast range of names, addresses and other genealogical information.
“Digitisation of the electoral registers will transform the work of people wishing to use them for family history research,” said Jennie Grimshaw, the Library’s curator for Social Policy and Official Publications. “Printed electoral registers are arranged by polling district within constituency and names are not indexed, so the process of finding an address to confirm names of residents is currently incredibly laborious. Digitisation represents a huge breakthrough as users will be able to search for names and addresses, thereby pinpointing the individuals and ancestors they’re looking for.”  
The other holdings included in the large-scale digitisation are drawn from the archives of the East India Company and the India Office. These records relate to Britons living and working in the Indian sub-continent during the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, up to Independence in 1948. They include over 1,000 volumes of ecclesiastical returns of births, marriages and burials, together with applications for civil and military service, and details of pension payments to individuals.

Antonia Moon, curator of post-1858 India Office Records said, “These records are an outstanding resource for researchers whose ancestors had connections with British India, whether as servants of the administration or as private inhabitants.”
The partnership between the British Library and findmypast.co.uk followed a competitive tender process and will see five million pages of UK electoral registers and India Office records digitised over the next year. The resources will become available via findmypast.co.uk and in the British Library’s Reading Rooms from early 2012; online access will be available to findmypast.co.uk subscribers and pay-as-you-go customers – access to users in the British Library Reading Rooms will be free.

Simon Bell, the British Library’s Head of Licensing and Product Development, said: “We are delighted to announce this exciting new partnership between the British Library and findmypast.co.uk, which will deliver an online and fully searchable resource that will prove immensely valuable to family history researchers in unlocking a treasure trove of content that up to now has only been available either on microfilm or within the pages of bound volumes. The Library will receive copies of the digitised images created for this project, so as well as transforming access for current researchers, we will also retain digital versions of these collections in perpetuity, for the benefit of future researchers.”

Elaine Collins, Commercial Director at findmypast.co.uk, said: “We’re very excited to be involved with this fascinating project. The electoral rolls are the great missing link for family historians: after censuses and civil registration indexes, they provide the widest coverage of the whole population. To have Irish and Scottish records alongside England and Wales is also a huge advantage. These records will join the 1911 Census, Chelsea Pensioner Service Records and many more datasets available online at findmypast.co.uk, which enable people to make fantastic discoveries day after day.”

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