Archive for 2011


10 million Cheshire Records published on Findmypast and free at SoG

 

Just a quick note to let you know that Findmypast have released 10 million new Cheshire records today.

The Cheshire Collection is an extraordinarily rich and comprehensive set of records provided by Cheshire Archives and Local Studies.

These records are essential to anyone with Cheshire roots or connections, as they cover not just the Church of England but also Roman Catholic and Non-Conformist registers, and, moreover, extend well beyond these core records of baptism, marriage and burial to a variety of other records giving biographical details for the residents of the county.

These records span the period 1538-1910. These records contain:

Find more information about these records here

 

Findmypast is available free at the Library of the Society of Genealogists and members of the Society received discounts on subscriptions to the site

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D-Day invasion of Normandy featured in latest Find My Past family history TV show

This week’s episode takes three people on a journey to uncover details about their ancestors who were all involved in the D-Day invasion in Normandy. The trailer can be seen on Youtube


The episode airs on Yesterday on Thursday 10th November at 9pm and is repeated daily throughout the following week. Yesterday can be found at Sky channel 537, Virgin TV channel 203 and Freeview channel 12. There is also more information on the Yesterday Facebook page

The episode focuses on the incredible story of HMS Swift which landed British troops at D-Day on the beach-head – and in doing so gained a new insight into the complexity that lay behind the feat of landing troops on the heavily defended shores of Normandy.

CONTRIBUTORS:

Robin Clarke is 25-years-old, engaged, has a baby boy, Jack, and is a Medical Secretary. She and her family live in the cottage next to her mother in rural Cheshire. Robin was taken to Normandy once when she was a young child and knows that her family were involved in the first Normandy landings, but doesn’t know the details. Since having a child of her own, she is passionate about passing on information about her family’s history to the next generation.

Kerry Wood, is a 33-year-old police officer in London and has a four-year-old daughter who is a quarter-French. She knows nothing about her ancestors’ involvement in D Day. Kerry knows a little about her grandparents and their involvement in the war and is keen to find out more.

Frances O Reilly, is in her mid-thirties. A graphic designer by trade she has two small children and lives in Epsom. She knows a little about her family history, she knows that her paternal grandfather was a doctor, as was her great-uncle ‘Johnny’ (on her paternal grandmother’s side) who lived close to his sister in Devon. Johnny had led ‘quite an exciting life’ and that he wrote a book but she has never read it.

 

Having missed the last couple of episode as I’ve been teaching the SoG’s Thursday evening class, I’m going to make sure  I take this opportunity to curl up and watch on Thursday night. Follow me on Twitter @SoGGenealogist and we can discuss what we think of the show.

 

Else Churchill

SoG Genealogist

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Book of the Month – November

November is a time of remembrance, when many people’s thoughts turn to their military ancestors and the Society of Genealogists is offering My Ancestor was in the British Army by Michael and Christopher Watts as our book of the month for November. Members and non-members alike can enjoy a 20% discount on the price of this comprehensive guide to British Army records during November. This book is an aid to family historians tracing ancestors who served in the British Army from 1660 up until World War Two. Members can take advantage of this offer in addition to their existing member’s discount, but unfortunately the offer is not available on trade orders. My Ancestor was in the British Army is available from the Society of Genealogists bookshop and online at www.sog.org.uk

 

Offer ends 30/11/11

 

 

 

Irish Prison Registers 1790-1920 on Findmypast.ie

Findmypast.ie have announced a remarkable new genealogy resource for Irish Family History Research  with 3.5 million entries from Irish Prison Registers 1790-1920

Today, findmypast.ie launched online for the first time the Irish Prison Registers 1790-1920, one of the greatest untapped resources for those tracing their Irish roots.

The original Prison Registers, held at the National Archives of Ireland, cover all types of custodial institutions, from bridewells, to county prisons, to sanatoriums for alcoholics. They contain over 3.5 million entries, spread over 130,000 pages, with most records giving comprehensive details of the prisoner, including: name, address, place of birth, occupation, religion, education, age, physical description, name and address of next of kin, crime committed, sentence, dates of committal and release/decease.

  • Launch of exclusive access to the Irish Prison Registers 1790-1920
  • · Over 3.5 million entries across 130,000 pages
  • · Drunkenness the most common offence – accounting for 25% of cases

The registers offer a real insight into 18th-19th century Ireland. They present evidence of a society of rebellion and social confrontation, where rioting and assault of police officers were everyday occurrences, and of rampant poverty and destitution, with the theft of everything from handkerchiefs to turnips.

The reasons for incarceration cover all types of crime but unsurprisingly perhaps the most common offence was drunkenness, which accounted for over 30% of all crimes reported and over 25% of incarcerations. The top five offences recorded in the registers are:

1. Drunkenness – 25%

2. Theft – 16%

3. Assault – 12%

4. Vagrancy – 8%

5. Rioting – 4%

The nature of these crimes was significantly different from those recorded in the UK. The rate of conviction for drunkenness and tax evasion was three times greater, and the rate of both destruction of property and prostitution were double what they were in the UK for the same time period.1

The records are full of individuals who were arrested for very minor offences, for example a record from the Cork City Gaol Court Book lists an arrest for Giles O’Sullivan (26), with no education and no previous convictions, on the 30th of March 1848 for being “a dangerous and suspicious character”. Other examples of the heavy hand of the law can be seen in the case of John Cunningham from Finglas (21) who was arrested for “Washing a car on a thoroughfare” and young Christopher Doyle (14) arrested “for being an idle, disorderly rogue and vagabond”.

The Irish population averaged 4.08 million over this time period2 and with over 3.5 million names listed in the prison records, it is clear to see how almost every family in Ireland was affected somehow.

Brian Donovan, Director of findmypast.ie, comments: “These records provide an invaluable resource for anyone tracing their Irish ancestors, as during the period covered almost every household in Ireland had a convict in their family. These records provide such a wealth of information that they are sure to shock and surprise almost anyone looking for the missing links in their Irish family tree.”

 

ABOUT findmypast.ie

Findmypast.ie is the world’s most comprehensive Irish family history website, providing easy-to-search, online access to some of the most significant Irish records that have ever been made available. This new site is a joint venture between two experts in the field: findmypast.co.uk, one of the leading family history websites and part of the brightsolid family, while Eneclann is an award-winning Trinity College Campus Company specialising in genealogical and historical research and the publication of historical records.

Based in Dublin, findmypast.ie has a dedicated team committed to providing the best experience possible when researching Irish family history.

www.findmypast.ie

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Change to GRO fiche index locations – Newcastle replaces LMA from 28 october

As family historians know, the General Register Office for England and Wales (GRO) provides
free public access to the index of events for birth,marriage,death, civil
partnership, adoption and overseas records. This information is made available
in microfiche format at a number of libraries and record offices across England
and Wales.

The list of centres acting as host sites for the complete set of the GRO
indexes is being extended to provide greater geographic coverage and from 14
November will include Newcastle City Library.

Please note that from 28 October, the indexes will no longer be available to
view at the London Metropolitan Archives.

From the 14 November the list of centres holding a complete set of GRO indexes
including those for more recent events will be as follows –

    • Birmingham Central
      Library
    • Bridgend Local and
      Family History Centre
    • City of Westminster
      Archives Centre
    • Manchester City Library
    • Newcastle City Library
    • Plymouth Central
      Library
    • The British Library.

Further details on the records available can be found on the Directgov website http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Governmentcitizensandrights/Registeringlifeevents/Familyhistoryandresearch/DG_175464

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