Society of Genealogists Archives


Society of Genealogists Wins Family History Award

In commemoration of its 100th Anniversary the Society of Genealogists has been awarded the Julian Bickersteth Memorial Medal by the Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies. The award is made to persons or organisations who have made notable and exemplary contributions to genealogy and  family history studies in the judgement of and at the discretion of the Institute’s Trustees .


Colin Allen Chairman of The Society of Genealogists accepts the Bickersteth Memorial Medal from 1 Society of Genealogists Wins Family History AwardSociety Chairman Colin Allen received the award on behalf of the Society  from Dr Richard Baker (Principal of the IHGS) and the Rt. Hon. The Earl of Lytton (President of the IHGS) at a ceremony in Canterbury on 23 July.

 

Kenneth Julian Faithful Bickersteth was born at Ripon on the 5th July 1885, the third son of the late Dr Samuel Bickersteth. Educated at Rugby, Christchurch, Oxford and Wells Theological College, Julian was ordained in 1909. He came to Canterbury as Archdeacon of Maidstone in 1943, having had a long career in education, both in England and Australia. He died on 16th October 1962, having spent his life “doing good just by being what he was….”, as was said by one well qualified to judgeCollin Allen Chairman of the Society of Genealogists accepts the Bickersteth Medal thumb Society of Genealogists Wins Family History Award.

Julian Bickersteth’s interest in education and the young never waned and it was from these very real promptings that his idea for The Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies arose as a means of investigating the history and structure of family life, which he rightly looked upon as forming the foundation of Christian civilisation. He left the realisation of his aims to Cecil Humphery-Smith, his godson, whom he had invited to form a school for family history studies in 1957. An exhibition of artefacts of family life was brought to Canterbury in 1960 and Julian lived to see the foundation of the Institute in Northgate in February 1961.  In 1964, the Institute was registered as an independent charitable Trust and Cecil Humphery- Smith provided funds so that the Trustees could make an appropriate annual award in memory of the man who was the inspiration and sponsor of the Institute, Julian Bickersteth,

 

 

 

 

medal2 thumb1 Society of Genealogists Wins Family History AwardThe Medal, designed by the donor in the form of a medieval armorial seal, has the arms of Bickersteth flanked by the Institute’s heraldic badge on the face and an heroic garland of oak leaves surrounding the recipient’s name on the reverse. It is cast from the original die in gilded silver.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Institute’s Trustees have awarded the Julian Bickersteth Memorial Medal to the following individuals at dinner or luncheon parties held in Canterbury, in London and elsewhere.

Sir Anthony Richard Wagner, KCB, KCVO
John Philip Brooke-Little, CVO
Dr Peter Laslett and Dr E.A. Wrigley
Professor Robert Cecil Gale
Frederick Humphery-Smith, MBE
Donald John Steel
Dr William Urry
Charles Wilfred Scott-Giles, OBE
The Earl Mountbatten of Burma
Francis W. Steer
Dr F.G. (Derick) Emmison, MBE
Sir Andrew Noble, Baronet, KCMG
Lieutenant Colonel Iain Spencer Swinnerton, TD
Leon Jéquier
Major Francis Jones, CVO
Peter C. Bartrum
Sir Colin Cole, KCB, KCVO
Sir Iain Moncrieffe of that Ilk, CVO, QC
Dr Mark Fitch, CBE
G.D. Squibb, MVO, QC
Jiri Louda
George Redmonds
The Duke of Norfolk, Earl Marshal, KG, GCVO, CB, CBE, MC, FSA    Cecil R.J. Humphery-Smith
Dr Bruno B. Heim, Archbishop of Xanthus
Roger Harmignies
Dr Arlene Eakle
The Hon. Sir George Bellew, KCB, KCVO
Michael Maclagan Esq., CVO
Terrick Fitzhugh
Szabolcs de Vajay
Dr Michael P. Siddons
Jeremy S.W. Gibson
Dr Jean-Claude Loutsch
The Genealogical Society of Utah
Brian Frith Esq., MBE
The Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, CB, OBE, MC, FSA
Gerard Joseph Brault
Clifford Reginald Webb
John Archibald Goodall
GENUKI
Robert Douglas Watt OStJ., MA, FHSC, FHS
Professor David George Hey, MA, PhD
Baron Hervé Pinoteau
Dr Nick Barratt

biographical details of recipients of the award up to 2001 can be found on the GENUKI pages http://www.genuki.org.uk/org/awards/bickersteth/recipients.pdf

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railway worker sized for amazon thumb My Ancestor was a Railway Worker   understand the new railway records on Ancestry.co.ukThe Ultimate UK Train Spotters’ Archive is now online and the Society of Genealogists book My Ancestor was a Railway Worker: a guide to understanding records about railway people can help you use this remarkable family history resource. Available from the Society’s online bookshop the author, Frank Hardy FSG, himself a former railway civil engineer, gives broad picture of the the railway industry handling passengers and freight in Britain and explains the terms and phrases that occur in Victorian and Edwardian staff records. He explains what your railway ancestor did and the records that can be found.  I’m delighted to say that many of these records are now available online.

In partnership with The National Archives the newly digitised historic records documenting the history of the British rail service through the lives of its employees  have been published on Ancestry.co.uk and are available free to use in the Society of Genealogists’ Library.

Two million railway employment records detail the people who made the Industrial Revolution possible

Records hark from a time when ‘Train Driver’ was one of the most coveted careers

Accident books reveal how dangerous the rail service was and caution records show how staff were reprimanded for mistakes

Details from the ‘big four’ companies; Great Western Railway, London, Midland and Scottish Railway, London and North Eastern Railway and the Southern Railway

In a world-first, Ancestry.co.uk,  in partnership with The National Archives, today launched online the Railway Employment Records, 1833 – 1963,a historic collection containing the employment-related records of British railway workers dating back to the invention of the locomotive in the early 19th century.

Billed as the ultimate train-spotters’ collection, the records tell the story of how the rail service grew during the Industrial Revolution and shows staff striving to ‘make it’ as one of the most desirable professions of the Victorian era – a train driver.

The collection of 1,998,159 records goes into intricate detail, listing not only name, home station and date of birth of the employee, but also information on their career progression, salary increases, rewards, fines or suspensions for misbehaviour and notes from superiors on the worker’s character and behaviour.

The records date from 1833, a time when the Great Western Railway,engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel,was in its infancy and the Stockton & Darlington line (opened in 1825) had been running for a little under a decade. By the middle of the 20th century, the entire rail network encompassed 6,000 stations and covered over 21,000 miles of track, with its development widely hailed as the primary catalyst for Britain’s industrial growth.

While today many young people aspire to be professional footballers or actors, during the rise of the railways, the role of ‘Engineman 1st Class’ (train driver) was one of the most coveted jobs available to the masses. As a result, men would join the service as labourers, cleaners or attendants and work their way up, often taking 20-25 years before controlling their own train.

However, unlike today’s dream jobs, the role hardly delivered fame and fortune, with the average wage of a train driver in the late 19th century standing at around 8/- a day – equivalent to around £10,000 a year today.2

Working in the railway service in the 19th century was also extremely dangerous as the country got to grips with this ‘new technology’, which is shown in the lists of injuries and fatalities documented in the archive going online today. Prior to 1900, there were approximately 98 major accidents resulting in hundreds of fatalities and over 2,000 serious injuries, all recorded by safety staff in meticulous detail.

With stakes so high, the rail companies introduced a series of strict reprimand systems whereby staff members were punished for behaviour that was deemed irresponsible or dangerous. These varied from minor fines (often of a shilling or two) to major disciplinary actions where the worker would be suspended without pay or fired.

Examples of misdemeanours found in the records include workers being ‘inebriated’ while at an engine, drivers demoted for running red signals and staff fighting amongst themselves whilst on duty.

At the same time, rail workers were actively rewarded for taking action that prevented possible accidents, with the good deed marked in red ink on their personal records and rewards of up to two weeks wages issued. As a result of this system and the advancement of rail safety, the early 20th century rail service became a safer place to work (and safer for passengers too).

The rail networks were brought under government control for the first time during WW1 but were returned to private ownership immediately afterwards when the bulk of the system was in the hands of the so-called ‘big four’ – the Great Western Railway, the London, Midland and Scottish Railway, the London and North Eastern Railway and the Southern Railway – all of whom have thousands of former employees listed in this collection.

During WW2, the companies had to join together to operate as one as the war effort put a severe strain on the railways’ resources and created a substantial maintenance backlog – part of the reason why the government brought the rail service into the public sector in 1945.

In fact, the majority of employment records in this collection date around this period (1947), although a number date up to 1963.

 

This database includes indexed images of employment-related records from a number of historic railway companies in England, Scotland, and Wales.

image My Ancestor was a Railway Worker   understand the new railway records on Ancestry.co.ukWhat is included?

All of the railways included in this database were once private companies that later came under authority of the British Transport Commission with the 1947 Transport Act. The collection features selected records from the following companies:
•RAIL226: Great Central Railway Company
•RAIL264: Great Western Railway Company
•RAIL397: London and North Eastern Railway Company
•RAIL410: London and North Western Railway Company
•RAIL411: London and South Western Railway Company
•RAIL414: London, Brighton and South Coast Railway
•RAIL415: London, Chatham and Dover Railway Company (formerly the East Kent Railway)
•RAIL426: London, Midland and Scottish Railway Company
•RAIL463: Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway Company
•RAIL491: Midland Railway Company
•RAIL1156: Special Collections: Retired Railway Officers’ Society

Approximately 50% of the books cover the Great Western Railway, while the books covering the London and North Western Railway are more dense with records. Most records are prior to 1949, though some date later.

What can I find?

The most common record type in the database is a staff register. Others include station transfers, pension and accident records (which can include death date), apprentice records (which can include father’s name), caution books, and memos.

Records will typically list an employee’s name, station, position, birth date or age, and various other details, such as salary, date entered service, and transfer information. For example, caution books list offenses employees were written up for and include name, date, grade, station, years of service, and date of suspension if applicable. Salary and wage registers list name, name of person recommending an employee for a position, date of appointment, salary or wage, dates of pay raises or decreases, age at the time the employee joined the railways, promotions, and remarks, which can mention transfers to different stations.

Records can be searched by name, birth year, event year, station, or company. Or they can be browsed by volume. In the browse, unless otherwise identified, the books are staff registers.

What is missing?

There are 58 pieces excluded from this collection for privacy reasons.

RAIL 264 Great Western Railway Company: Staff Records •Pieces 412, 413, 440, 442, 443, 471-522
RAIL 397 London and North Eastern Railway Company: Staff Records •Piece 13

There are currently 6 sections missing from these records. They will be added to the database at a later date.

RAIL 264 Great Western Railway Company: Staff Records •Piece 328: Register of weekly staff No.6 London District 1905-1913
•Piece 416: Birmingham District 1898-1913
•Piece 415: London Division 1896-1906
•Piece 417: Chester Division 1898-1909
•Piece 438: Register and histories of traffic staff at stations in Wales 1872-1892
RAIL 426 London, Midland and Scottish Railway Company: Staff Records •Piece 4: Register of scale advances (adults other than 5th grade) 1941 – 1946
Ancestry.co.uk International Content Director Dan Jones comments: “These records shed light on what it must have been like to work on the railways in its early years – a dangerous job with strict rules and severe reprimands for error, but with the promise of reaching that highly coveted role as an engine driver.

“The level of detail within the records is also staggering, which means family history enthusiasts can gain a real insight into their ancestor’s character – be it through records of promotions and rewards or perhaps punishments and demotions.”

Caroline Kimbell, Head of Licensing at The National Archives, said: “The Railway Employment Records are one of the largest and earliest archives of civilian trades in the UK. The records reveal fascinating stories about life on the railways from their early, dangerous beginnings to their heyday as a key component of Britain’s Victorian infrastructure, and reflect the significance of the railway companies as huge employers in both towns and country. Many families will find railway ancestors here, and the level of detail in these records make them a valuable online resource for historians and rail enthusiasts alike.”

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The Society of Genealogists is pleased to announce the forthcoming President’s Lecture in celebration of the Society’s 100th anniversary.

On the occasion of the Society’s Centenary, Patric Dickinson takes the opportunity to offer some reflections on the many changes that have taken place in the world of genealogy during the fifty years since Sir Anthony Wagner’s lecture ‘Genealogy and the Common Man’ (given as part of the Golden Jubilee celebrations in 1961), a period that has witnessed the growth of family history from a hobby enjoyed by a small minority to a popular activity pursued by millions of people worldwide. Patric Dickinson cuts the cake at the Society of Genealogists Centenary Gala Dinner thumb Society of Genealogists Presidents Centenary Lecture   Genealogy: Our Favourite Insanity

With Patric Dickinson, LVO, MA, FSG, Clarenceux King of Arms and President of the Society of Genealogists

Venue: The Swedenborg Society, 20-21 Bloomsbury Way, London WC1A 2TH

Tuesday 18th October at 7pm . Buffet & Wine . Tickets: £17.50*

Online booking at www.sog.org.uk (events & lectures section).

 

Alternatively contact our events co-ordinator on:
020 7553 3290 or email: events@sog.org.uk

14 Charterhouse Buildings, Goswell Road, London EC1M 7BA
Tel: 020 7251 8799
Fax: 020 7250 1800

 

*Ticket price includes a donation for buffet & wine.

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When did the Society of Genealogists’ neighbourhood become cool and trendy?

 

I’ve just stepped out for a bite to eat on a quiet Saturday at the Society of Genealogists. The library is busy and there is a workshop on in the lecture room but it’s a quiet day generally as there  is little of the normal weekday traffic buzzing around our corner of London’s EC1M where Goswell Road meets Clerkenwell Road and Old Street.sog frontweb thumb When did the Society of Genealogists’ neighbourhood become cool and trendy? Since the closure of the Family Record Centre I’ve not walked about our neighbourhood so much recently but it doesn’t take much to notice that there has been a significant gentrification of the area. The building works next door to the Society have finally finished and the new William Harvey Heart Centre next door to us at the end of the Charterhouse Buildings cul-de-sac was formally opened on July 7th 2011.  The Heart Centre is part of the new Queen Mary Charterhouse Square Campus in collaboration with Barts Hospital and The London NHS Trust.Opposite the Society’s front door , on what used to be the last bomb site in London, stands a modern block of apartments, very expensive office furniture shops and a veterinary practice.

Turn left at the end of the Charterhouse Buildings cul-de-sac you come to historic Clerkenwell now with new restaurants including the very highly acclaimed Modern Pantry and the exclusive Zetter Hotel and Townhouse on the corner of St John’s Square. Over the road  is the fascinating St John’s Gate; the the historic home of the Order of St John and a landmark in Clerkenwell since 1504, which has been picked by Londoners to represent Islington on a commemorative badge for the 2012 Olympics.  The church of St James Clerkenwell still provides a quiet oasis of calm to sit and eat a sandwich on a sunny lunch time but the trendy set still head for the pubs and bars of Clerkenwell Green and Farringdon during the week.

Today’s weekend engineering works on the Metropolitan and Hammersmith & Circle lines closed Barbican underground station, so a stroll up Old Street to Old Street tube station past the  newly renovated church of St Lukes’ Old Street means you can see how the new LSO St Luke’s concert and rehearsal centre have added vibrancy to this part of town.  Turn off Old Street down Whitecross Street and you’ll come to some of the best street food and restaurants in London. Usually the street food vendors serve exotic  but incredibly tasty and cheap cuisine to the lunch time office workers and residents from the nearby Peabody Trust Estate (wonderfully interesting flats built in London clay brick) but the restaurants stay open at weekends too. This weekend the street food vendors, local shops and artists held a  food and rather avant-gard music arts festival as part of the open London free weekend events leading up to the Olympic cultural celebrations.  The food smells were divine and I wish I hadn’t had lunch before I walked down the street. WhitecrossStreet thumb When did the Society of Genealogists’ neighbourhood become cool and trendy? I did resist the temptation of the most wonderful meringues and pastries. I loved the jazz and Whitecross2 thumb When did the Society of Genealogists’ neighbourhood become cool and trendy?local community choir but couldn’t quite work out the art.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WhitecrossStreetportrait thumb When did the Society of Genealogists’ neighbourhood become cool and trendy?

Turn right at the bottom of White Cross Street past Fortune Street Park and you’ll come out at the Barbican Tube station opposite the Barbican Arts Centre and Exhibition Halls. All of this culture is available within 30 minutes round walk from the Society of Genealogists. A very pleasant way to get some air and stretch your legs before hitting the SoG books shelves and manuscripts. I like working on a  Saturday.

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Society of Genealogists’ Summer Membership Offer

 

Rain on St Swithin’s Day forebodes a dreadful summer of 40 days of rain. So what are  family historians to do if you can’t be distracted from your genealogy by trips beach or forays into the garden? Well you could  just get on with your genealogical research and how better to do that than join the Society of Genealogists in its Centenary Year?

 

The Society of Genealogists’  Summer Membership Special Offer waives the joining administration fee of  £10 until 30 September 2011. This means your first year’s membership is only £45 (or £27 for overseas members). Join the Society  of Genealogists today and your discounted membership will be valid until October 2012. IN ADDITION the Society’s Summer membership Offer includes free  Family Tree Builder genealogy software (while stocks last).SoGBuildingPhotoGMcover2010web thumb Society of Genealogists Summer Membership Offer

 

Benefits of membership including FREE access to the SoG Library,  FREE data online, FREE Genealogists Magazine, FREE access to genealogy websites in the SoG Library and discounted books and courses are outlined on the Society of Genealogists website .

 

Download the application form today and quote SSP11 to take advantage of the Summer Special Membership Offer.

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