Today, in honour of St David’s Day, leading family history website www.findmypast.co.uk has announced the launch of the first tranche of parish records from Wales – part of a major new project with the Welsh County Archivists Group and the National Library of Wales.

 

3,878,862 million records from parish registers from the Church in Wales can now be searched for the first time online from today comprising:

1,418,921 baptism records covering 1538-1911

950,254 marriage records covering 1539-1926

340,002 marriage banns covering 1701-1926

1,169,685 burial records covering 1539-2007

These records cover the counties of Cardiganshire, Carmarthenshire, Denbighshire, Flintshire and Glamorganshire.

Over the following weeks approximately 5 million more Welsh parish records from Anglesey, Brecknockshire, Caernarvonshire, Merionethshire, Monmouthshire, Montgomeryshire, Pembrokeshire and Radnorshire will be added to the website, enabling anyone to search the complete parish records from Wales online for the very first time.

Catherine Richards, county archivist from the Welsh Archives, said: “Archive Services in Wales hold a wealth of information, and our written history reflects the rich culture and heritage of the Welsh nation. Celebrating family history has had a long tradition in Wales. Welsh Law made it essential for people to know how they were descended from an ancestor and the ancient patronymic system was an important way of conveying and reaffirming lineage. The importance of tracing Welsh roots has been revived through modern genealogy. Parish registers provide one of the primary sources for the family historian and help to bring to life Welsh ancestors from the past.”

Paul Nixon, Content Licensing Manager at www.findmypast.co.uk  added: “This is a really exciting development for anyone with Welsh family history. Even if you are currently unaware of your Welsh roots, a simple search of the 46 million UK parish records at www.findmypast.co.uk  will now potentially reveal relevant results from the new Welsh Collection, opening up a whole new chapter in your research.”

The records can be accessed within the Life Events section of www.findmypast.co.uk and are free to search. The transcripts and handwritten images of the original parish registers can be viewed with PayAsYouGo credits or with a Full subscription to www.findmypast.co.uk. The full findmypast.co.uk website is free to view in the library of the Society of Genealogists

 

 

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London School Admissions & Discharges, 1840-1911 on Ancestry.co.uk and free at SoG

 

This is a collection of School Admission and Discharges for schools in London. This collection contains more than a million students from 843 different schools. In 1833, Parliament started to provide money for the construction of schools for poor children, although it was still largely a private affair. Mandatory schooling was a local decision until 1870, when children were required to attend from age 5 to 10. By 1918, education was required up to the age of 14.

These records are lists of children who were admitted to and discharged from schools. When education was required, children could be discharged from their schooling if they were needed to work to help support the family. The records vary by school and some are more detailed than others. The records available on Ancestry.co.uk  include:

· Admission Date

· Name

· Parents’ names

· Parents’ occupation

· Address

· Birth date

· Age

 

 

Ancestry.co.uk is available free to use in the Library of the Society of Genealogists

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The Society of Genealogists at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012

Well, another eventful show at Olympia has been a great success for the Society of Genealogists. I’m glad to say The Society remains integral to the event having continued our partnership with the new owners BBC Bristol Magazines (now Immediate Media). New owners mean new features and tweaks to the event while retaining its essential personality and ethos.

 

Who Do You Think You Are Live 2 2012 thumb The Society of Genealogists at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012

The new colour scheme with the dayglo pink carpet was a bit dazzling to the eyes but more importantly expansion into further parts of the upstairs gallery and a subtle readjustment to the table plan meant significantly wider aisles and more space to walk about. Attendance figures were slightly up on 2011, which is remarkable considering the economy. The show continues to try to strike a balance to provide attractions for the beginner and the more advanced genealogists. As well as using our own newly designed stand to recruit new members, promote the Society and sell our products, the SoG organises all the talks and presentations in the Show Studios (note another change of name) and of course provides remarkable expert consultations and help to the hordes who queue for answers to their questions upstairs in the gallery. Queue for Ask the Experts at Who Do You Think You Are Live thumb The Society of Genealogists at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012The Society of Genealogists’ Family History Show itself is a key area within the vast space that is Olympia National Hall and the exhibitors from local societies, archives and smaller venues still have a distinct space for themselves independent of the more commercial companies. This means that the Society’s name is well represented on banners and signs all around the show, and the event remains the best place for us to recruit and sign up lots of new members. Heartfelt thanks to everyone who helps us to do this – staff and volunteers alike. You are an astonishing team.Who Do You Think You Are Live Olympia 2012 3 thumb The Society of Genealogists at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012

 

The Celebrity Theatre was as popular as ever and I hear (though of course I was far too busy to go myself wlEmoticon smile The Society of Genealogists at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012) that Emilia Fox’s account of her experiences as a participant in the Who Do You Think You Are? TV show was very moving. The audience was delighted that she was joined on stage by her Father Edward Fox and her mother Joanna David was in the audience. I, however, was more delighted that some of the SoG talks in the Theatre afterwards attracted even more attendees than the celebrities with some of our talks having people sitting on the floor at the back of the theatre as ALL the seats were taken. It was also a great move to have tables and chairs outside the gallery studios so you could sit or stand outside to listen in if the studio itself was full. I think some of the quiet moments on the main floor during the show are attributable to the fact that up to about 600 people on average were attending the talks each session.Else Churchill speaking at Who Do You Think You Are LIve 2012 thumb The Society of Genealogists at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012 I have to thank all our speakers who gave their time and expertise freely – especially those who travelled from Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Europe, Israel, USA and Canada to be with us. The programme was varied and many of the handouts and slides from the presentations will be found free of charge on the SoG website show pages www.sog.org.uk . Video clips from some of the talks will also appear on the Who Do You Think You Are? Live website.

New features at the show include a much larger military history and memorabilia area, photo dating booths and a fascinating section on ancestral trades, crafts and occupations with displays from rural museums. If you had nurses, postmen or coal miners in your family (like me) there was a lot to look at. Ancillary services and products from archival supplies, photographic scanning and producers of software and charts were doing a roaring trade as usual. This year Ancestry.co.uk’s stands were large white and elegant and very busy. The staff from Findmypast.co.uk were loud and funny with excellent costumes. Both stands had free access to databases and lots of fascinating presentations. TV Expert Eric Knowles was kept busy giving personal Antiques Roadshow consultations for those who bought their family heirlooms along and I wandered longingly past the Moorcroft pottery stand several times trying to convince myself to invest in some beautiful objects (and the Moorcroft stall holders did very well I am told – though sadly not from me in the end). The gourmet sausage stand was excellent and busy as usual but the show’s traditional Italian ice cream stand was sorely missed.

Readers may be aware that the Society of Genealogists is very active in the Social Networking world of Twitter, Facebook and Blogs. This year we encouraged Social Networkers to make ourselves public and meet up and 50 of us wore our colourful “Follow Me” best-in-show tweeter and blogger rosettes all weekend. Many of us tweeted live throughout the show and there are a huge number of bloggers who mentioned the show and gave daily round ups. Social Networking was the focus of the keynote talk from My Heritage’s Lawrence Harris and expert panel contributors included Internet guru Peter Christian FSG, Google experts Dan Lynch and Lisa Louise Cooke, and D Josh Taylor the new genealogy expert for Findmypast’s American venture. Then nearby Hilton Hotel and Pizza express at Olympia remain focal meeting places (as does the Hand and Flower Pub opposite) and I was delighted to attend receptions generously hosted by Findmypast and the US Association of Professional Genealogists [APG] (though I have to admit I was an accidental gate crasher on the latter but graciously welcomed by their President Kenyatta D. Berry.) It was most amusing to witness SoG Trustee Nick Barratt’s passion for Liverpool football club as friends, volunteers and some SoG Trustees retired to the pub on Sunday after we had dismantled and pack off home all the SoG stand at the end of the show). Lisa Louise Cooke at Who Do You Think You Are Live 2012 thumb The Society of Genealogists at Who Do You Think You Are? Live 2012

Who Do You Think You Are? Live is THE place to go to hear and meet the experts and see what’s coming up in our world. SoG Trustee Nick Barratt and SoG Fellow Peter Christian both looked into their crystal balls and predicted an interesting slant on how mobile technology, more open data and greater collaboration will be game changers (though I would point out that what is now call “crowd sourcing” has been going on for years within the genealogical community as volunteer projects). I look forward to investigating if new genealogy portals like Mocavo really will enhance my online genealogy searching experience. I was impressed with some of the smaller niche source data sites that were exhibiting their wares – especially Peter McCracken’s Shipindex.org that led me to links about a ship that transported my 2X Great Uncle to Tasmania in the 1840s.

As you would expect gossip and rumour flourish at any event. I was delighted that our friend (and recipient of the SoG’s Prince Michael of Kent Award for services to genealogy), Wall to Wall TV’s Chief Exec, Alex Graham could confirm that a new 10 episode series of the UK Who Do You Think You Are? Show is currently being filmed and another has been commissioned, thus scotching rumours of its demise. Who Do You Think You Are? Live itself continues to flourish and has announced the date of the next show on 22-24 Feb 2013. They have plans for a very exciting future in partnership with the Society of Genealogists – which I guess means a lot of hard work for all of us in the future.

Else Churchill

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NEW MERCHANT SEAMEN RECORDS ONLINE and FREE at the Society of Genealogists

 

Leading family history website www.findmypast.co.uk has today released online for the first time Merchant Seamen records from the 19th century in association with The National Archives of the United Kingdom.

 

* First time that 19th century merchant navy records are available online

* UK merchant seamen records from two centuries now searchable at findmypast.co.uk

 

359,000 records of individuals covering the years 1835-1857 have now been added to the website. Details contained within the records can vary, but can include name, age, place of birth, physical description, ship names and dates of voyages. Often this information can be given in the form of coded entries which can easily be deciphered using downloadable finding aids from The National Archives.

The records are taken from volumes held at The National Archives in series BT112, BT113, BT114, BT115, BT116 and BT120 and were created by central government to regulate the merchant shipping industry. As the series spans two decades, some individuals may appear in multiple series, making it possible for maritime historians or those with ancestors in the merchant navy, to trace a seaman’s service over time.

Janet Dempsey, Maritime Expert at The National Archives commented:

"These records are as significant to the social historian as they are to the family historian. No other group of working class men and women had the freedom of movement and ability to see the world as these 19th century mariners.

"This was the Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen’s earliest attempts at keeping individuals records and resulted in four different registers over twenty two years. Although more of a challenge to work with than other family history sources, it can be very satisfying to decipher the codes and have your investigative efforts rewarded with sometimes surprisingly rich detail."

In 2011 findmypast.co.uk published Merchant Navy Seamen records from 1918-1941 in association with The National Archives, some of which include photographs.

Debra Chatfield, family historian at findmypast.co.uk added: "The Merchant Navy Seamen records will be of great interest to family historians worldwide, as so many of us have generations of ancestors, who made their living at sea. These records will add more detail to our mental picture of their lives."

All the Merchant Navy Seamen records at findmypast.co.uk can be searched for free from the Education & Work section of the website. Transcripts and images can be viewed either with PayAsYouGo credits or a Full Subscription.

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Births, Deaths and Marriages is a new sitcom for BBC Radio 4 set in a Local Authority Register Office where the staff deal with the three greatest events in anybody’s life.

Written by and starring David Schneider (The Day Today, I’m Alan Partridge), it features chief registrar Malcolm Fox who is a stickler for rules and would be willing to interrupt any wedding service if the width of the bride infringes health and safety. He’s unmarried but why does he need to be? He’s married thousands of women.

Alongside him are rival and divorcee Lorna who has been parachuted in from car parks to drag the office (and Malcolm) into the 21st century. To her marriage isn’t just about love and romance, it’s got to be about making a profit in our new age of austerity.

There’s also the ever spiky Mary, geeky Luke who’s worried he’ll end up like Malcolm one day while ditzy Anita may get her words and names mixed up occasionally but as the only parent in the office, she’s a mother to them all.

The episodes are being recorded in March and April – we will let you know when they are broadcast as soon as we find out

 

 

 

Free Tickets are available to be in the audience  for the recordings of the show from the BBC website

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