Society of Genealogists shut for New Year and Closed Week – reopens Tuesday 11 January

 Society of Genealogists shut for New Year and Closed Week    reopens Tuesday 11 January

The Society of Genealogists will be closed from 4pm Thursday 30 December and will reopen to members and the public on Tuesday 11th January at 10am . Bookshop  and events orders can still be placed online and will be dispatched during the week commencing 11 January 2011.

During the first week of January the Society will be working on various projects in the library and stocktaking. Our first lecture when we reopen in the New Year will be on Wednesday 12 Jan at 11.30 with Tim Lawrence speaking on Using the Society of Genealogists’ Members Area Website and outlining the new developments for SoG data in the future.  Tickets for this lecture are free but can be booked online via the SoG online shop

However there is still plenty for all those who have taken part in Start Your Family Tree WeekStartYourFamilyTreeWeekimage thumb Society of Genealogists shut for New Year and Closed Week    reopens Tuesday 11 January.

Each day from Boxing Day until New Year’s Day, findmypast.co.uk, sponsors of the Society of Genealogists’ Centenary Year have giving you a helping hand on your journey into your past. Look at their website for the Start Your Family Tree Week daily hints, tips and activities to help you research your family tree.

Look at the findmypast  website for the Start Your Family Tree Week daily hints, tips and activities to help you research your family tree. Discover some of the great prizes the Society of Genealogists, findmypast and other partners are offering for family historians throughout the week including*  :-

  • A day tracing your family tree with famous genealogist, Else Churchill at the Society of Genealogists in London – using the resources of the SoG and looking at aspects of their research. The prize includes return travel by train to London from within the UK and two nights’ accommodation in London for the winner and a guest
  • 1 free membership of the Society of Genealogists in our centenary year
  • 1 ticket to a day course at the Society of Genealogists, London: ‘Family History for Beginners and Refreshers’ with Geoff Swinfield on Saturday 5 March 2011.
  • Society of Genealogists‘ publications
    • 1 x My Ancestor was an Agricultural Labourer by Ian Waller
    • 1 x My Ancestors were Londoners by Cliff Webb
    • 1 x My Ancestor was an Apprentice by Stuart Raymond
    • 1 x My Ancestor was in Service by Pamela Horn
    • 1 x My Ancestor was in the British Army by Chris and Michael Watts
  • A free start your family history beginners session at the Society of Genealogists with community officer Ashley Young who can help anyone start using computers and get the most from free online resources at the Society of Genealogists Library, such as findmypast.co.uk and other online family history sites usually only available on pay-per view or subscription

Make it your New Year’s resolution to carry on researching your family history – imagine what you can show your family next year.

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Burke’s peerage updates in the Society of Genealogists’ family history library

Family historians with aristocratic ancestry will know how useful Burke’s Peerage can be as a finding aid. However the printed version can become dated very quickly as people mentioned in its pages have children, are married, divorced or die.

Society of Genealogists’ member Nicholas Newington-Irving has therefore produced 12 volumes of updates to the 1999 and 2003 editions of Burke’s Peerage that list over 57,000 births, deaths and marriages that have occurred between 1999 and 2010. The information has been gleaned from collections of newspaper cuttings in the possession of the compiler.

An online index to these updates has now been made available for the first time on the Society of Genealogists’ Members Area. This contains the surname and forename of the person concerned, together with a note of which volume and page number the updates can be found in. Non members can do a free name search here but it is necessary to become a member to view the full references.

This is just one of a growing number of family history resources to be found on the Society’s Members Area.

Tim Lawrence

Head of Library Services

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Devon wills in the Society of Genealogists’ family history library

Anyone researching their family history in Devon will regret the loss of much of the county’s probate material in the 2nd world war. However the Society of Genealogist’s family history library in London holds indexes and transcripts of a number of Devon wills that were made before the loss, and some of these have now been made available on the Members’ Area of the Society’s website.

The Fothergill collection is a typical example. It was compiled in the early 1900s by Gerald Fothergill (1870-1926), an eminent genealogist and historian who lived in London. It is not clear why he compiled abstracts of sundry Devon wills, but he evidently went to Exeter and Taunton to study and abstract them, since almost all were proved and kept in one or other of those places. The abstracts can be found in the Middle library and an online index can be searched here.

Another book at the Society lists wills and administrations proved or granted at the Peculiar Court of the Dean of Exeter, from the 1630s to 1857.  All the original probate copies of wills proved in this court were destroyed in 1942.  This list therefore presents (with a few exceptions) the only surviving evidence that well over a thousand Devon individuals did in fact leave wills or had their estates administered.

The jurisdiction of the Dean’s Court covered the parish of Braunton (north-west of Barnstaple) and the Cathedral Close.  The latter area seems not to have been an actual parish, but merely the area immediately around the cathedral in Exeter.  Many of those who lived in the Cathedral Close worked in or for the cathedral in some way. The index can be searched here.

A third work lists wills and administrations proved or granted at the Peculiar Court of the Vicars Choral of Exeter, from the 1630s to 1857.  How and why the singing men in the choir at Exeter Cathedral came to have their own court is not known. Woodbury, the only parish which came under their jurisdiction, is a large one, not far south-east of Exeter.  An average of about four wills/administrations per year were dealt with, though this varied depending upon the time period. The index can be searched here.

The Devon Wills Project is seeking to gather details of as many Devon wills as possible and the Society is grateful for their help in compiling these indexes..

Tim Lawrence

Head of Library Services

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,

Genealogists Magazine now available to members online

GM2 228x300 Genealogists Magazine now available to members onlineThe Society of Genealogists is delighted to announce that future issues of its highly respected journal The Genealogists’ Magazine will be made available to members online, as well as in printed form. Details of how to access them can be found below.

The journal, first published in 1925, carries a wide range of genealogical articles, as well as news of what is happening at the Society and new additions to its extensive family history library.

The journal is just one of the many benefits of being a member of the Society of Genealogists, others including free access to its library and discounts on its wide ranging programme of lectures and publications.

 If you are already a member you can login and view the current issue of the Genealogists’ Magazine (volume 30) here. Please note that you will have to login to the Members’ Area to view the Magazine. Details of how to do this can be found here.

Tim Lawrence, Head of Library Services

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Was your ancestor a railwaywoman?

Although the majority of people employed by the railways were men, a number of women were also to be found amongst their ranks.

Helena Wojtczak, in her book “Railwaywomen” (Hastings Press, 2005), tells the untold story of the British railwaywoman, charting her progress from exploited drudge in the 1830s to steam engine driver by the 21st century.

railwaywomen1 Was your ancestor a railwaywoman?

A copy of the book is held in the Society of Genealogists’s library in Clerkenwell and Society volunteer Frank Hardy has recently produced an index to all 2644 people mentioned in the text. This index has now been made available on the Members’ Area of the Society’s website where a free basic search can be made.

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,

 Page 1 of 3  1  2  3 »