Making Contact: Surnames & Pedigrees Online and in the Society of Genealogists Library   Half day Course 27 April

Drawing up a Family Tree 300x294 Making Contact: Surnames & Pedigrees Online and in the Society of Genealogists Library   Half day Course 27 AprilOnce you’ve got back a few generations, one of the most important ways of making progress in your family history is making contact with others who have interests in the same surnames or perhaps even share some of your ancestors. Peter Christian will help you find what research may have been done before.

Else Churchill will give an overview of the various places within the Society of Genealogists Collections, both online and at the library, where genealogical research on families and surnames can be found. She will explain how the new look SoG website can help you find information on surnames and describe how to find material in print and in the  manuscript collections at the SoG.

 

A half-day course on Saturday, 27 April (10:30-13:00) with Peter Christian and Else Churchill. Cost £17.50/£14.00 SoG members. This course must be must be pre-booked and pre-paid, through our website or by telephone: 020 7553 3290. SoG members should enter the online shop after logging on to the MySoG section of our website. Do you have a question? email the events department.

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Little Italy: The Story of London’s Italian Quarter, a one-hour talk on 24 April

In the 19th century there grew to be such a concentration of Italians in one part of London that the area became known as “Little Italy”. Based on his book of the same name, Tudor Allen will talk about the fascinating story of the Italian quarter in Holborn from the time of the first Italian settlers up to the last days of the community in the late 20th century.

A one-hour lecture on Wednesday, 24 April at 2pm, cost £6.00/£4.80. This lecture must be must be pre-booked and pre-paid, through our website or by telephone: 020 7553 3290. SoG members should enter the online shop after logging on to the MySoG section of our website. Do you have a question? email the events department.

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London Parish Registers – Lecture on 17 April

londonPRlowres London Parish Registers   Lecture on 17 AprilWere your ancestors from London? Learn where the various parish registers are kept and how to best access them.

A one-hour lecture with Geoff Swinfield on Wednesday, 17 April at 2pm, cost   £6.00/£4.80 SoG members. This lecture must be must be pre-booked and pre-paid, through our website or by telephone: 020 7553 3290. SoG members should enter the online shop after logging on to the MySoG section of our website. Do you have a question? email the events department.

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Tracing European Ancestors from Beyond the Danube – a half-day workshop on 13 April

The session will mostly be of interest to those researching ancestry of families thought to have Polish, Hungarian, Slovak, Czech or Ruthenian/Ukrainian ethnicity.  The focus will be on how research in Eastern Europe differs from family history in the UK, Remote access to secular and religious sources, and databases.  Practical advice and experience of visiting and searching in local archives including Vienna Migration (by choice and obligatory). There will be emphasis throughout on the importance of addressing these topics in their local historical context. Please note we shall not be dealing with research into tracing victims and survivors of the WWII holocaust.

Case histories are welcome, please bring your own personal family questions along! For further information, please contact the events department.

Saturday, 13 April from 2-5pm, cost £17.50/£14.00 SoG members. This course must be must be pre-booked and pre-paid, through our website or by telephone: 020 7553 3290. SoG members should enter the online shop after logging on to the MySoG section of our website. Do you have a question? email the events department.

 

 

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2.5 million criminal records to be published online for first time by Findmypast.co.uk

FIND ANY VILLAINS OR VICTIMS LURKING IN YOUR FAMILY HISTORY?

Else Churchill, Genealogist at the Society of Genealogists,  can be seen on Sky News on Wednesday 21 February (about 10.30ish) talking about the latest digital release of 2.5 million criminal records to be published online for first time by Findmypast.co.uk.

The biggest collection of historical criminal records from England and Wales is being published online for the first time by leading family history site findmypast.co.uk in association with The National Archives. Access to Findmypast and these records are available free at the Society of Genealogists.

Over 2.5 million records dating from 1770-1934 will be easily searchable and provide a wide variety of colour, detail and fascinating social history, chronicling the fate of criminals ranging from fraudsters, counterfeiters, thieves and murderers and their victims.

 

They contain mugshots, court documents, appeal letters, examples of early Edwardian ‘ASBOs’- where habitual drunks were banned from pubs and entertainment venues -and registers from the prison ‘hulk’ ships, which were used when mainland prisons were overcrowded. One such hulk, the ‘Dolphin’, housed 6,000 prisoners between 1829 and 1835.

 

Amelia dyer 2.5 million criminal records to be published online for first time by Findmypast.co.uk

Police photo of Amelia Dyer after arrest, 1896 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There are details of Victorian serial killers including Amelia Dyer, who, between 1880 and 1896, is believed to have murdered 400 babies by strangling them with ribbon and dumping them in the Thames. The records show she was hanged at Newgate Prison in 1896 aged 58.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another particularly gruesome murderer who appears in the Crime, Prisons and Punishment records is Catherine

Kate Webster filtered 2.5 million criminal records to be published online for first time by Findmypast.co.uk

English: Kate Webster (1849? – 29 July 1879), the killer of Julia Martha Thomas (the “Richmond Murder” or the “Barnes Mystery”) Português: Kate Webster (1849-1879), a assassina do “Mistério de Barnes” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Webster, who the records show killed widow Julia Martha Thomas, 55. She pushed her down the stairs, then strangled her, chopped up her body and boiled it. Julia’s head was found in David Attenborough’s garden in 2010. 

The information in the records comes from a variety of Government departments including the Home Office, Prison Commission, Metropolitan Police, Central Criminal Court and the Admiralty. The records from 1817-1931 will be published first followed by the period 1770-1934 in the coming months.

 

Debra Chatfield, a family historian at findmypast.co.uk , said: “We have been eagerly anticipating the launch of these records that provide an amazing opportunity to trace any villains and victims in your own family.

 

“We have painstakingly published online entire registers containing mugshots of habitual drunks that feature incredible descriptions of criminals’ appearances, demeanour and identifying marks.

 

“The newspaper articles that are available on findmypast.co.uk provide unparalleled detail and show how the crimes were reported when they were committed. This supplements the new criminal records and makes searching through as enjoyable as it is easy, whether you are researching your own family history or are interested in social history.”

 

Paul Carter, Principle Modern Domestic records specialist at The National Archives added: “These records span several government series and show the evolution of the criminal justice system in the nineteenth century as the country dealt with the impact of industrialisation, urbanisation and population growth.

 

“They record the intimate details of hundreds of thousands of people, beginning with judges’ recommendations for or against pardons, to petitions through which criminals and their families could offer mitigating circumstances and grounds for mercy, and later, licences containing everything from previous convictions to the state of a prisoner’s health.

 

“As well as the Georgian highway robber, the Victorian murderer and the Edwardian thief, the courts often dealt with the rural poacher, the unemployed petty food thief or the early trade unionist or Chartist. The records are a fascinating source for family, local and social historians.”

 

ENDS

 2.5 million criminal records to be published online for first time by Findmypast.co.uk

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